THE FIRST RUNNING OF THE TRIPLE CROWN – COMPLETE SET OF THREE RARE NEWSPAPERS

 

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FIRST RUNNING OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY (1875)
FIRST RUNNING OF THE PREAKNESS (1873)
FIRST RUNNING OF THE BELMONT STAKES (1867)

This unique set of original and complete newspapers report the inaugural runnings of the Triple Crown–the three iconic thoroughbred racing events. In my thirty-seven years in original historic newspapers, I have never before seen a complete set, and simply cannot put another together at any price! This truly is a one-time opportunity for owners, stables, enthusiasts, and anyone else with interest in one of the greatest sporting events in American history.

ky-derby-ny-herald-1875-400-kb.jpgTHE KENTUCKY DERBY – INAUGURATION OF THE LOUISVILLE JOCKEY CLUB 

The New York Herald
May 18, 1875 

The exciting report reads, in part: “The great event of the day was the Kentucky Derby, which was won by Aristides, making the fastest time on record by a three-year-old.” The value of the Stakes in the first Derby to the winning horse was a grand total of $2,850!

The Kentucky Derby is arguably the most recognizable horse race in the world, attracting the the finest three-year-old thoroughbreds, as well as millions of spectators. It is frequently referred to as the “Run for the Roses,” in that a huge blanket containing 554 red roses is draped over the winner.  First run in 1875, the year the Louisville Jockey Club (later known as Churchill Downs) was opened by Colonel M. Lewis Clark, the winning entry was a chestnut colt named Aristides, ridden by African American jockey, Oliver Lewis. A statue of Aristides now stands in the garden behind the clubhouse. (Click on above image to view the full First Kentucky Derby report).

preakness-1873-nyt-report-275-kb.jpgTHE FIRST PREAKNESS

The New York Times
May 28, 1873

The Preakness, second jewel in the Triple Crown, has a longer history than even the Kentucky Derby. First run on May 26, 1873, it was named for the horse that won the Dinner Party Stakes in 1870. There were but seven horses running that day at Pimlico in Northwest Baltimore, Maryland, a racetrack considered far more important than Churchill Downs at the time. The winner of the inaugural race was a colt called “Survivor” who won by a huge ten lengths over the other contestants, a record that remains the longest winning distance in Preakness history. (Click on above image for complete details of the first Preakness).

belmont-stakes-1867-ny-herald-500.jpgTHE VERY FIRST RUNNING OF THE BELMONT STAKES

The New York Times
June 20, 1867

The Belmont Stakes is the oldest Triple Crown event, predating both the Preakness and Kentucky Derby. The first running took place on Thursday, June 19, 1867, at Jerome Park in the Bronx, New York.  The new race was financed by August Belmont, Sr., for whom the race was named. The grueling 1 5/8 mile run (1 1/2 miles today) was known as the “Test of the Champion” for its long distance.  The surprise winner was a filly named “Ruthless,” who defeated a field of stronger male horses thus becoming the first filly to win a major race like this one. She just edged out “DeCourcey” by a head in an exciting race in which the lead changed hands numerous times according to the in-depth newspaper report in The New York Times. (Click twice on above image to read the full exciting report–it’s like being back in time at the race!)

This truly one-of-a-kind trio of complete and original newspapers reporting the inaugural races of each Triple Crown leg is a major coup for thoroughbred owners, stables, and racing fans alike. This is likely the only set we will ever be able to offer.

Price: $7,500 for all three original issues (includes lifetime letters of authenticity signed by historian and appraiser, Mark E. Mitchell)

BATTLESHIP “MAINE” SUNK IN HAVANA HARBOR

img_4438.jpgTHE WRECK OF THE MAINE – INVESTIGATION BEGINS
CATALYST OF THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR

The Mason City Globe-Gazette
Mason City, Iowa
February 24, 1898

“ALL EYES ON HAVANA Public Must Patiently Await Results of Maine Inquiry.”  The inquiry included salvage divers attempting to piece together the puzzle of how the U.S. Battleship “Maine,” was mysteriously blown up in Cuba. See scans of the three front page sketches of the terrible wreck.  260 American sailors were killed in the explosion. After the investigation, the Americans claimed it was caused by a Spanish mine, while the Spaniards insisted it had to be an internal explosion on the vessel. 13 years later, the hull was re-examined by American experts and the inquiry board claimed the explosion was indeed external. The verdict still remains controversial, as the hulk was immediately towed out to deep water before there could be any further investigation. “Remember the Maine!” became a battle-cry in the ensuing Spanish-American War.

This very scarce newspaper is in good condition, with an irregular spine and a little marginal chipping. Virtually all newspapers of this particular vintage are fairly fragile. This one is still intact and would be a great candidate for framing…and a wonderful conversation piece!  Spanish-American War newspapers are very uncommon.  This one is a must for any serious collection of famous events in American history.

$295

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IMPEACHED PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON ACQUITTED OF ALL CHARGES!

impeach-mh.jpg The Case Abandoned and the Court Adjourned

The New York Times
May 27, 1868

This most historic issue of the Times carries front page single-column headlines: “IMPEACHMENT. The Final Vote Taken on the Second and Third Articles. Acquittal of the President on Both Charges. The Case Abandoned and the Court Adjourned.”

The Times in-depth reporting of the Impeachment Trial comprises much of the front page, beginning with, “The impeachment proceedings begun by the House of Representatives on Saturday, the 22d of February, is at an end. The President is acquitted of high crimes and misdemeanors, and the Court stands adjourned without date.” The galleries were packed with interested spectators awaiting the final verdict. The Times own editorial on the Impeachment Trial stated, in part, “The closing of Impeachment and the adjournment of the Court will, we think, gratify the great body of the people. While there is–as there has been for a long time–a strong desire on the part of the Republican Party for the removal of Mr. Johnson from office, there has been no wish, among the people, to have this result brought about by any means that would not be universally recognized as just and fair. And we are inclined to believe that the course of the trial satisfied almost everbody that, however imprudent, overbearing and unjustifiable Mr. Johnson’s conduct has been, the evidence did not convict him of such high crimes and misdemeanors as would warrant his conviction and removal from office.”

The trial of the President, who incurred the wrath of Thaddeus Stevens and other Congressmen by dismissing Secretary of War Stanton, on grounds for impeachment for high crimes and misdemeanors finally comes to an end. After months of arguments and counterarguments, the charges were finally dismissed when the Senate failed, by one vote, to attain a two-thirds majority. Had Johnson been impeached, the entire American Democratic System might have been thrown into turmoil.

8 pp., complete, and in excellent condition, save for a very small missing piece at the upper left corner of the front page–it affects no text and is not noticeable. A most important issue of The Times!

$750.

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EARLY LOS ANGELES NEWSPAPER

eve-expess-la-mh064.jpgULYSSES S. GRANT FOR PRESIDENT!
INDIAN ATTACK IN TEXAS! TRAIN FALLS THROUGH A BRIDGE!

Evening Express, Los Angeles, California
Wednesday, July 31, 1872

Here is an amazing newspaper–a Los Angeles issue from 1872 during the Wild West period of outlaws, train robberies, Indian attacks, gunfights and more. From the wires of the Western Union Telegraph Line I see a report of an “Indian raid near Laredo in which seventeen persons were killed and many ranches and stores plundered and stock driven to Mexico.” In other news, “A passenger train on the Kansas Pacific Railroad fell through a bridge over Coon creek. Five emigrants were killed and several employees wounded!” I love the intricate illustrated ads including the “PIONEER STAGE LINE,” a great ad for a dentist with a teeth sketch, and the “Exchange Livery and Feed Stable.” The paper was a strong supporter of Gen. U.S. Grant for President in the 1872 Election.

Folks, this was Los Angeles well before Hollywood, Beverly Hills and MGM studios! I guarantee you’ll be up nights reading and re-reading this issue and showing it to everyone you know! Four pages, complete, and in fine, well-preserved condition. According to my references, this is the only known issue of this date in existence! If it were a rare coin, we’d be talking five figures! Newspapers are still on the ground floor of major collectibles!

$370

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THE FIRST AUTOMOBILE ADVERTISEMENT!

1st-auto-ad.jpg         “DISPENSE WITH A HORSE.”

Scientific American
New York

August 13, 1898

The Winton Motor Carriage Co. of Cleveland, Ohio advertises “THE WINTON MOTOR CARRIAGE.” In a bold ad headed: “DISPENSE WITH A HORSE”, the company’s new horseless carriage is said to travel at a speed between 3 and 20 miles per hour with no vibration. “Kane’s Famous First Facts” along with numerous websites note this to be the very first advertisement for an automobile. Intricate illustration of the car as well.

The advertisement apparently was effective, because Robert Allison of Port Carbon, Pennsylvania, purchased a Winton Motor Carriage after seeing the ad in Scientific American. Later that year, Winton sold 21 more vehicles, including one to James Ward Packard who later established his own automobile company.

This photo-filled illustrated newspaper is also simply loaded with shots of the destroyed Spanish fleet at the Battle of Manila Bay during the ongoing Spanish-American War. Admiral Dewey’s U.S. battleships massacred Admiral Cervera’s ships in a decisive encounter in the Philippines.

The original and complete issue containing all sixteen pages, and preserved in very fine condition. One of the most important publications of the late 19th century we have ever encountered.

$1,500

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FREDERICK DOUGLASS–WASHINGTON, DC MARSHAL

fred-douglass-death-full-front.jpgALSO, A SKETCH OF JOSIAH HENSON, SAID TO BE THE INSPIRATION FOR “UNCLE TOM’S CABIN”–HE WAS A RESCUER OF SLAVES ON THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

Harper’s Weekly
New York

April 21, 1877

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), the most important African American figure of the 19th Century, is appointed Marshal of the District of Columbia by President Rutherford B. Hayes. This was the first appointment of an African American to require United States Senate confirmation. By occupying this post and distributing jobs, Douglass continued and strengthened the hold of black civil servants on minor government positions–the cornerstone of the staunchly middle-class black community in the Nation’s Capital.Douglass’ numerous accomplishments are documented in a superb biography on the fifth page with a sketch (see scans). Born a slave in 1818, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Douglass learned to read and write early in life, escaped the bonds of slavery, and went on to become an orator, author, abolitionist, statesman, minister, journalist, newspaper publisher, and even a consultant to President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War.

Twenty pages, complete issue in excellent condition. A key item for the collector/historian of African Americana.

$425

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THE STATUE OF LIBERTY IS PRESENTED IN PARIS

statue-liberty-full-front.jpgTHE LARGEST STATUE IN THE WORLD – OFFICIAL PRESENTATION
THE STRUCTURE IS NOW ON ITS WAY TO NEW YORK HARBOR

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, New York
June 13, 1885

An incredible gift from France to the United States, sculpted by Bartholdi, is unveiled in Paris for all to see. The largest of three front page illustrations shows the statue in scaffolding in Paris, titled: “OFFICIAL PRESENTATION OF THE STATUE OF “LIBERTY ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD,” PARIS, JULY 4TH, 1884.” The other sketches show a sectional view of the Statue of Liberty, and a bust photo of M. Bartholdi, the designer. All sketches come under the heading: “FRANCE-AMERICA.–THE GIFT OF THE FRENCH REPBULIC TO THE UNITED STATES.” An inside page story gives news of the presentation, and the fact that the structure was now on its way to America to stand in New York Harbor.

16 pp., complete and unedited, and in very fine condition. There are many other large illustrations and stories in this fascinating issue of Harper’s Weekly, but after reading the paper cover to cover, I’d probably want to frame it! What a conversation piece!

$350

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PRESIDENT GARFIELD FINALLY DIES IN WASHINGTON FROM AN ASSASSIN’S BULLET

garfield-death-mh.jpgGARFIELD BECOMES THE SECOND ASSASSINATED U.S. PRESIDENT.“The Last Faint Spark of President Garfield’s Life Goes Out Forever.”
“The Wretched Guiteau in More Imminent Danger of Lynching Than Ever.”

The Daily Pioneer Press, St. Paul & Minneapolis, Minnesota
Tuesday, September 20, 1881

Front page headlines and a 2″x2″ sketch of the late President who was shot by the assassin, Guiteau, two months earlier. The newspaper prints full details of Garfield’s last days, the announcement to the press, sentiment in the Nation’s Capital, an article on the assassin, and a wonderful editorial. Chester A. Arthur becomes the new President.

The complete 8-page newspaper in excellent condition throughout. Thick black mourning rules divide the front page columns indicating an important death.

$450

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ARMY OF WOMEN CHASE ELIGIBLE MEN IN WASHINGTON, DC

women-chase-in-dc-mh.jpg“Husbands Wanted! No Prior Experience Necessary!”

Lafayette Daily Journal, Lafayette, Indiana
Wednesday, January 2, 1878

Amusing report: “One of the most fearful and wonderful sights of the capital is the vast army of women and widows who have found their way here for husbands. Senators and Congressmen are rated as top targets.”

This scarce Midwestern newspaper also conatains a front page report from San Francisco on the “Production of the Precious Metals.” Wells, Fargo & Co.’s statement in California and the Far West shows the amount of gold and silver production–still very impressive in 1878, some thirty years after the start of the California Gold Rush.

4 pages, fine condition. Check out the incredible illustrated advertisements–they really give a “feel” of the 1870s in Middle America.

$145

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ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL RECEIVES A PATENT FOR HIS TELEPHONE INVENTION!

bell-telephone-mh.jpg“Mr. Watson — come here — I want to see you.”

Scientific American, New York
April 8, 1876

In a listing entitled, “Index of Inventions,” is the patent given to Alexander Graham Bell for a device that transmits sound over wire. The patent is listed as “Telegraphy, A.G. Bell………….174,465.” On March 10, 1876, Bell would use his device to call his assistant, Thomas A. Watson, from an adjoining room, saying, “Mr. Watson — come here — I want to see you.” This experiment marked the first successful trial of the telephone, and ushered in a brand new age in the history of communications.

Sixteen pages, loaded with sketches of the very latest inventions as well as some very fascinating ads. And there are articles on “The Depth of the Sea,” a sketch of a Bengal Tiger attacked by a crocodile with article, and quite a bit more. Excellent condition throughout.

$750

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