ADOLF HITLER DEAD IN BERLIN!

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Daily Record
Boston, Mass.
May 2, 1945

The enormous front page 3 1/2″ letters say it all:

“HITLER KILLED”

Subheads announce:

“Dies at His ‘Command Post in Berlin’ Nazi Radio Informs Reich”

“DOENITZ TAKES HELM; ‘WILL CONTINUE FIGHT’”

This truly remarkable newspaper contains pages and photos of the stunning news–Der Fuehrer has finally been killed. Of course, we know from history that he apparently committed suicide in his command bunker below the streets of Berlin as the bombed out capital of the Third Reich was being overrun by Russian soldiers.  Admiral Doenitz, the genius behind the German U-Boat campaign, took overall command of remaining Nazi forces.

Couldn’t scan it, but there is a phenomenal two-page centerfold spread of thirteen photographs showing Hitler’s rise and fall in Nazi Germany including his younger days, his parents, the adoring crowds and more. It was difficult to take my eyes off these rare images.  This is the complete 28-page issue that came out on May 2, 1945 in New York City announcing the glorious news to all Americans.  A superb historical issue you’ll read many times over…and I’m certain show to your friends.  It’s that graphic!

SOLD

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THE GREAT PLAGUE! MANY MORE DEATHS EXPECTED

plague-newes-front-page663.jpgEUROPE UNDER SIEGE BY THE DREAD DISEASE
NO CURE – EVEN TRADE WITH OTHER COUNTRIES AFFECTED

The Newes
London, England
August 25, 1664

This extremely rare newsbook (precursor to the first newspapers) contains a fascinating report from Holland on the progress of the Great Plague raging in England and on the European Continent.  In part, “The States have made the best provision they can to hinder the further spreading and increase of the Plague, by appointing Orders to be observed upon strict penalties in all cases of Danger and Inconvenience, and likewise by advising with Physicians, and furnishing all Infected Towns with Antidotes….but this is all too little where God has decreed a Judgement upon a People….” and much more including a “Quarantaine” upon our goods and services…” as other nations stopped trade with “infected countries,” and even within the borders of a single nation.  Several other news reports refer to the Plague as well. The rat-borne Plague decimated the population of Europe.

8 pp., in very fine condition printed on high quality rag paper. Pages have come loose from the spine (normal).  Boldly printed and just a lovely newsbook. These publications have become nearly impossible to locate – a must for any serious early newspaper collection.  See the scans!

$950

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1660 ENGLISH NEWSBOOK – PUBLISHED DURING THE COMMONWEALTH PERIOD!

1660-newsbook-page-one.jpgCHARLES STUART (SHORTLY TO BE KING CHARLES II) STILL IN HOLLAND
ISLAND OF JAMAICA “THRIVING”
FALSE PAMPHLETS PRINTED – CENSORSHIP TAKES PLACE!

Mercurius Politicus
London, England
March 22 to 29, 1660

Here is an extremely scarce early English newsbook printed at the end of the Commonwealth leading into the Restoration of Charles II and the English Monarchy. There is a short report stating that Charles Stuart was still in Holland (although he would shortly return to England after over a decade in exile and be crowned King Charles II following the Commonwealth Period under Oliver and Richard Cromwell.

The Diamond Frigate returned from Jamaica bringing letters from Governor Edward D’Oiley “….wherein he gives an Account of the healthfull thriving state and condition of our people in that Island, assuring that the English Interest would have been much more advanced in those parts of the World, had they not been prevented of the expected supplies, by reason of the successive alterations of the Supreame Power in England.”Reports from the West Indies (indeed, all of America) were scarce in early English news publications.  This weekly issue also contains a strict notice concerning “….many Scandalous and False Pamphlets….which are daily published…” From now on all pamphlets must gain Royal Authority first!

16 pp., octavo and in very nice condition with huge white borders.  Besides the above, there is news from France, Sweden and other nations in 1660. Newsbooks such as this one are becoming almost nonexistent. They are absolutely fascinating to hold in your hands and read over and over again!  This one is no exception.

$1,200

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DEATH OF KING CHARLES II, “THE MERRIE MONARCH”

dth-king-charles-bp623.jpgHE WAS THE FIRST KING OF THE RESTORATION PERIOD IN ENGLAND
IN 1664, HIS FLEET OF SHIPS TOOK NEW AMSTERDAM FROM THE DUTCH
(IT WAS RENAMED NEW YORK FOR HIS BROTHER, NOW KING JAMES II)

The London Gazette
Feb. 5 to Feb. 9, 1684

Here is the very first report in an English newspaper of the passing of England’s Charles II.  The sad news is published on page one beginning: “Whitehall, February 6, 1684. ON Monday last in the morning our late Gracious Soveraign King Charles the Second was seized with a violent Fit, by which his Speech and Senses were for some time taken from him, but upon the immediate application of fitting Remedies He returned to such a condition as gave some hopes of His Recovery till Wednesday night, at which time the Disease returning upon him with greater violence, He expired this day about Noon.”

Charles’s brother James, Duke of York, ascends to the Throne of England as James II. That announcement begins: “Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to his mercy our late Sovraign Lord King Charles the Second of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease, the Imperial Crowns of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, are solely and righfully come to the High and Mighty Prince James, Duke of York and Albany, His said late Majesties only Brother and Heir.” Also published is the announcement and proclamation of the new King James II.

Single sheet issue printed both sides and in truly excellent white condition!  Possibly the finest known specimen.

$3,000

KING EDWARD VIII ABDICATES THE THRONE

BRITISH MONARCH TO WED WALLIS SIMPSON OF BALTIMORE
THE DUKE OF YORK TO SUCCEED EDWARD, WILL BECOME GEORGE VI
FALSE HEADLINE SAYS “York to Take Crown as Albert I.”

The Milwaukee Leader
December 10, 1936

The front page banner headline says it all: “KING GIVES UP THRONE FOR LOVE OF WALLIS.”

Here in full detail is the amazing story of the King who gave up his throne for the woman he loved. One of the most infamous scandals involving the British Monarchy. Wallis Simpson, from Baltimore, Maryland, met and fell in love with the then Prince of Wales. Though Edward was known as something of a playboy, this liaison was unthinkable as Mrs. Simpson was not yet divorced from her husband, and was not of royal blood. The Queen Mother and Royal Family were utterly shocked. Public opinion turned against the King when he announced that he would marry Wallis, and he was finally forced to abdicate the throne. The new King George VI bestowed on them the titles of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. The couple remained highly controversial owing to their friendship with Nazi Dictator Adolf Hitler.

The front page also contains a superb photo of Edward and Mrs. Simpson. “Monarch Will Marry American Sweetheart When Divorce is Final.” Inside page publishes the text of King Edward’s Abdication Announcement.  Complete issue in fine condition–quite displayable.

$350

THE ACCESSION OF QUEEN VICTORIA

victoria-1837-access645.jpgDEATH OF KING WILLIAM IV
VICTORIA BECOMES QUEEN OF ENGLAND

The Examiner
London, England

June 25, 1837

One of the most complete accounts of the legendary Queen’s accession to the Throne of England ever published. This issue contains sixteen pages describing Queen Victoria, the late William IV (very lengthy biography), a complete eyewitness account of the royal procession from Kensington to the Palace of St. Jame’s, and and a report titled: “QUEEN VICTORIA THE FIRST. THE ACCESSION.” When Victoria arrived at St James’s, “….a double royal salute was fired from the guns in the park, and responded to by merry peals from the bells of St. Martin’s and St. Margaret’s….The instant she presented herself all were uncovered, and at the same moment a loud and enthusiastic cheer burst from the assembled multitude. Again and again it pealed upon the ear, mingled with the fervent prayer of “Long live Queen Victoria.”

16 pages, complete, and disbound from a volume many years ago. Four pages including the cover are bordered in black in mourning for the late King William. Fine condition throughout.  A most historic event in British history.

$375

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DEATH OF SIMON BOLIVAR

THE LIBERATOR OF SOUTH AMERICA PASSES AWAY

National Intelligencer
Washington, DC

February 15, 1831

A breaking news report on the front page is headed: “DEATH OF BOLIVAR!!”  “The (Jamaica) Courant contains the official announcement of the death of General Simon Bolivar, the Liberator of South America.”  This historic issue also, Bolivar’s last proclamation to the Colombian people which he states, in part, “COLOMBIANS:–You have aided me in concentrating my forces to cherish liberty where tyranny had fixed its abode. I have unceasingly and disinterestedly exerted my best energies for your welfare. I have even abandoned my fortune and my personal tranquility in your cause.  My enemies abuse your credulity, and endeavor to destroy my reputation by questioning my love of liberty; and fell0w-citizens, I grieve to say it, that I am the victim of my persecutors, who have now conducted me almost to my grave;–but I pardon them.”  The great San Martin also weighs in on the passing of Bolivar in a proclamation.  Bolivar fought hard to rid South America of Spanish colonialism.

Four pages, full folio, and in fine condition. The Intelligencer was THE great newspaper in our Nation’s Capital at this time.  Check the scans for one of the numerous RUNAWAY SLAVE notices offering large rewards from plantation owners!

$360

THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO – LORD WELLINGTON’S OFFICIAL REPORT

waterlloo-niles-fp642.jpgNAPOLEON DEFEATED BY THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON IN BELGIUM
ONE OF THE GREATEST LAND BATTLES EVER FOUGHT

Niles’ Weekly Register
Baltimore, Maryland
August 5 1815

Lord Wellington’s official report from Waterloo on the terrific battle and crushing defeat of Napoleon marking the end of his reign as Emperor of France.  The graphic account comprises five columns and puts the reader right smack in the middle of the fighting.  Casualties were immense on both sides with officers falling like flies. Much of this issue is filled with breaking news from Europe regarding the new changes in France, the manifesto of King Louis XVIII, and more. There are also reports of expeditions against the Indians on the American frontier.

Sixteen pages, quarto size, very good to fine condition, light scattered foxing.  An absolute must for any Napoleonic historian or collector.  Nile’s Register is considered the chief forerunner to today’s news magazines.

$1,250

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THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR AND DEATH OF ADMIRAL HORATIO NELSON

1805-trafalgar-mast-1.jpgA DECISIVE VICTORY FOR ENGLAND, BUT ALSO A GREAT LOSS (NELSON)
COMPLETE EYEWITNESS DETAILS OF THE BLOODY BATTLE

The London Gazette, EXTRAORDINARY
November 6, 1805

We are truly proud to present first report of Admiral Collingwood’s (Nelson’s second in command) official account of the most famous English Naval battle since the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1688. The admiral describes the triumph over the combined French and Spanish Fleet, lists the dead and wounded, and laments the death of Britain’s naval hero, Lord Horatio Nelson, who was mortally wounded while pacing the deck of his powerful flagship Victory.  The long report reads, in small part: “Euryalus, off Cape Trafalgar, October 22, 1805, SIR, The ever to be lamented Death of Vice-Admiral Lord Viscount Nelson, who, in the late Conflict with the Enemy, fell in the Hour of Victory, leave to me the Duty of Informing my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty…”, followed by an in-depth account of the events leading to the battle, and the historic sea-fight itself. Collingwood continues: “…The Action began at Twelve o’clock, by the leading Ships of the Columns breaking through the Enemy’s line…the Conflict was severe; the Enemy’s Ships were fought with a Gallantry highly honorable to their Officers, but the Attack on them was irresistible, and it pleased the Almighty Disposer of all Events, to grant His Majesty’s Arms a complete and Glorious Victory…Such a Battle could not be fought without sustaining a great Loss of Men, I have not only to lament, in common with the British Navy, and the British Nation, on the Fall of the Commander in Chief, the Loss of a Hero, whose Name will be immortal, and his name ever dear to his Country.” Nelson invoked several new tactics that broke the enemy’s line of warships and created chaos–many of the French and Spanish ships never got into the battle!  In London, Trafalgar Square commemorated the legendary victory, and features a large statue of Horatio Nelson. In addition, his flagship “Victory” is berthed in Portsmouth where I had the honor to be piped aboard in my Naval uniform in 1987, and was allowed to examine Nelson’s cabin–quite a thrill for me.

Four pages, last page blank, partial auburn tax stamp on page two, excellent condition throughout.  All other newspapers obtained their reports on the event from this printing. One of the rarest and most sought after of English newspapers.

$7,500

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DEATH OF WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART

mozart-dth-notice647.jpg Also in this issue: a report on the “Bounty” Mutineers”
and an obituary of Sir Joshua Reynolds

The Gentleman’s Magazine
London

April 1792

In the obituary section of this famous journal is a six-line notice of the great composer’s death. Born in Salzburg, Austria in 1756, the child prodigy wrote, conducted, and performed some of the most beautiful music in history (my personal favorites are the two flute concertos and Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter”–his last). I have never seen mention of this event in any other contemporary publication. This issue also contains lengthy obituaries of Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Gustavus III, King of Sweden.

Mutiny on the Bounty – further, there is a report on the search for the Bounty’s crew of mutineers still on Tahiti. Sixteen were recaptured, the rest, along with Fletcher Christian, had long since headed for Pitcairn Island.

101 pages, very fine condition, bound in rich leather with marbled end papers and gold lettering.  Two rare antique plates are also included.  The Gentleman’s Magazine was the first publication in history to utilize the title “Magazine.” A truly important piece of music history.

$3,750

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