THE FIRST RUNNING OF THE TRIPLE CROWN – COMPLETE SET OF THREE RARE NEWSPAPERS

 

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FIRST RUNNING OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY (1875)
FIRST RUNNING OF THE PREAKNESS (1873)
FIRST RUNNING OF THE BELMONT STAKES (1867)

This unique set of original and complete newspapers report the inaugural runnings of the Triple Crown–the three iconic thoroughbred racing events. In my thirty-seven years in original historic newspapers, I have never before seen a complete set, and simply cannot put another together at any price! This truly is a unique opportunity for owners, stables, enthusiasts, and anyone else with interest in one of the greatest sporting events in American history.

ky-derby-ny-herald-1875-400-kb.jpgTHE KENTUCKY DERBY – INAUGURATION OF THE LOUISVILLE JOCKEY CLUB 

The New York Herald
May 18, 1875 

The exciting report reads, in part: “The great event of the day was the Kentucky Derby, which was won by Aristides, making the fastest time on record by a three-year-old.” The value of the Stakes in the first Derby to the winning horse was a grand total of $2,850!

The Kentucky Derby is arguably the most recognizable horse race in the world, attracting the the finest three-year-old thoroughbreds, as well as millions of spectators. It is frequently referred to as the “Run for the Roses,” in that a huge blanket containing 554 red roses is draped over the winner.  First run in 1875, the year the Louisville Jockey Club (later known as Churchill Downs) was opened by Colonel M. Lewis Clark, the winning entry was a chestnut colt named Aristides, ridden by African American jockey, Oliver Lewis. A statue of Aristides now stands in the garden behind the clubhouse. (Click on above image to view the full First Kentucky Derby report).

preakness-1873-nyt-report-275-kb.jpgTHE FIRST PREAKNESS

The New York Times
May 28, 1873

The Preakness, second jewel in the Triple Crown, has a longer history than even the Kentucky Derby. First run on May 26, 1873, it was named for the horse that won the Dinner Party Stakes in 1870. There were but seven horses running that day at Pimlico in Northwest Baltimore, Maryland, a racetrack considered far more important than Churchill Downs at the time. The winner of the inaugural race was a colt called “Survivor” who won by a huge ten lengths over the other contestants, a record that remains the longest winning distance in Preakness history. (Click on above image for complete details of the first Preakness).

belmont-stakes-1867-ny-herald-500.jpgTHE VERY FIRST RUNNING OF THE BELMONT STAKES

The New York Times
June 20, 1867

The Belmont Stakes is the oldest Triple Crown event, predating both the Preakness and Kentucky Derby. The first running took place on Thursday, June 19, 1867, at Jerome Park in the Bronx, New York.  The new race was financed by August Belmont, Sr., for whom the race was named. The grueling 1 5/8 mile run (1 1/2 miles today) was known as the “Test of the Champion” for its long distance.  The surprise winner was a filly named “Ruthless,” who defeated a field of stronger male horses thus becoming the first filly to win a major race like this one. She just edged out “DeCourcey” by a head in an exciting race in which the lead changed hands numerous times according to the in-depth newspaper report in The New York Times. (Click twice on above image to read the full exciting report–it’s like being back in time at the race!)

This truly one-of-a-kind trio of complete and original newspapers reporting the inaugural races of each Triple Crown leg is a major coup for thoroughbred owners, stables, and racing fans alike. This is likely the only set we will ever be able to offer.

Price: $15,000 for all three original issues (includes lifetime letters of authenticity signed by historian and appraiser, Mark E. Mitchell)

1941 BASEBALL HISTORY – BROOKLYN DODGERS’ MICKEY OWENS’ LEGENDARY DROPPED 3RD STRIKE

thebigmuff5.jpgDODGER CATCHER MUFFS 3RD STRIKE IN 9TH INNING ALLOWING
YANKEES TO EVENTUALLY WIN A KEY WORLD SERIES CONTEST

INCREDIBLE FRONT PAGE HEADLINES AND GRAPHIC PHOTOS OF THE LEGENDARY PLAY!

The Boston Post
October 6, 1941

Of all the rare newspapers we have EVER owned (and this includes Babe Ruth’s 60th Home Run), this complete issue of the Boston Post is one of our personal favorites.  One glance at the scans will convince you–it is simply chilling!  My father told me a great deal of Major League Baseball lore, and Mickey Owens muff of what should have been the final strike in the 9th inning was the one I really remembered.  But, to actually see it in print as those did back in 1941 when this newspaper was put out on the stands–priceless!!

As the beginning of the front page report opens, “It could have happened only in Brooklyn.”  Mickey Owens couldn’t catch pitcher Hugh Casey’s low curveball to Tommy Henrich (who had swung and missed for the third strike and final out of the game), who ended up on first base.  Casey never recovered after this play as the Bronx Bombers, starting with Joe DiMaggio, belted the Dodger hurler for four runs to win the fourth game of the 1941 World Series, 7-4. The front page contains two huge graphic photos of the play while the Sports page continues the massive game coverage with three additional photos, big headlines and even a large cartoon. The complete story of the game is included plus the box score and composite WS box score.  The hapless “Bums” never recovered from the 9th inning debacle as the Yankees would go on to win the Series, 4 games to 1.

This remarkable issue has other news and features as well including the Death of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, a great photo of Shirley Temple and a huge (3/4 of a page) Oldsmobile advertisement (it just leaps out at you)!

This is the complete 18-page newspaper as printed back in 1941 – one of the top sports newspapers (for my money, that is) I’ve yet seen.  Condition is very fine with no problems or tears noted.  I’d recommend reading it cover to cover a few times, show my friends, and then have it framed!

$2,150

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MICKEY MANTLE HITS THREE HOMERS IN ONE GAME…FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE PLATE!

MANTLE BECOMES FIRST PLAYER IN BASEBALL HISTORY TO HIT HOME RUNS
BOTH LEFT-HANDED AND RIGHT-HANDED….IN ONE GAME!

YANKEE SLUGGER ACCOUNTS FOR ALL FIVE RUNS IN VICTORY OVER DETROIT TIGERS

ALSO…TED WILLIAMS SIGNS WITH BOSTON RED SOX FOR $75,000

The Detroit Free Press
May 14, 1955

The Sports Page headlines say it all: “MANTLE PUTS SLUG ON TIGERS, 5-2.”  “3 HOMERS TOO MUCH FOR GROMEK.” The Free Press publishes both the fantastic achievement from Yankee Stadium in New York, the complete box score, PLUS a great photo of “The Mick” handling three bats at one time!  

Also in this issue is a report that the great Ted Williams is glad to be “back to work” with the Boston Red Sox for 1955.  “The Splendid Splinter” had considered retiring, but decided to come back once again. During the season, he appeared in 98 games hitting an amazing .356 with 28 home runs.  Nice photo of “Teddy Ballgame” practicing a bunt of all things!

The complete issue contains 24 pages and is in nice shape.  The paper has some pages wholly or partially separated at the spine apparently when the issue was disbound from a 1955 volume years ago. The only damage I see is to the last unimportant page (23-24).  With Mantle rookie cards selling for $5,000 up to $280,00+ (and there are a great many around), this historic issue is quite the bargain to say the least!  I seldom, if ever, see a newspaper on Mickey Mantle.

$475

NEW YORK YANKEES BOUGHT BY COL. JACOB RUPPERT

yankees-bought-1.jpgBECOMES SOLE OWNER OF THE “BRONX BOMBERS”
PAYS $1,250,000 FOR THE BASEBALL CLUB
PRICE INCLUDES YANKEE STADIUM

The World
New York
May 22, 1923

The World reports the historic sale of the New York Yankees to Colonel Jacob Ruppert for $1.25 million–a price that included the new Yankee Stadium (and, of course, Babe Ruth)!  The Yankees were at that moment poised to become the greatest baseball franchise in history as they would begin to pile up American League Pennant and World Series championships. The front page contains a small photo of Col. Ruppert while the report continues on to page 10 (Sports) with the headline: “Ruppert Buys Out Huston’s Interest In Yanks for $1,250,000.” There is a photo of Col. Huston, one of the former owners.  But, perhaps best is Col. Ruppert’s formal statement on the sale in which he talks some about the history of the New York Yankees. “In 1915 our attendance was 256,000. During the past four years it has averaged annually over a million and it is not at all improbable that the attendance this year will be one and one-half millions.”

In other sports news, the Yankees win their eighth straight game 5-0 over the Chicago White Sox with Babe Ruth bashing two doubles.  In another sports story, the heading reads: “Cobb’s Hit in Ninth Beats the Athletics.” The great Ty Cobb gets a game-winning single for the Detroit Tigers–story and box score.

This is the complete and original newspaper in fine condition. There are a few small blank pieces missing from the spine area, but they aren’t really noticeable. I might frame pages one and ten – it would make a historic display piece.

$950

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“SHOELESS” JOE JACKSON BOUGHT BY THE CHICAGO WHITE SOX

joe-jackson-article.jpgOWNER CHARLES COMISKY PAYS $31,500+ FOR THE STAR BASEBALL PLAYER

The New York Times
August 21, 1915

The legendary “Shoeless” Joe Jackson, the Cleveland Indians leading batter, is traded to the Chicago White Sox for $31,500 and three players (although the text article on the Sports Page indicated the price was only $15,000).  Jackson, whose career ended ingloriously following the infamous “Black Sox” scandal in the 1919 World Series, was one of baseball’s greatest players. He averaged .356 for his career. In his first season with the then Cleveland Naps, he hit an astonishing .407. Great contemporaries like Walter Johnson (who called Jackson “the greatest natural ballplayer I’ve ever seen”), and Ty Cobb all acknowledged Jackson’s extraordinary skills. Babe Ruth himself copied Jackson’s “feet-together” batting stance and power stride into a pitch.

Complete newspaper, usual browning and such, but in nice shape overall stored flat for years in an old bound volume. A truly rare story and a nice piece for a serious baseball collection.

$550

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BABE RUTH’S FIRST HOME RUN AS A YANKEE!

babe-ruth-first-hr-article.jpg“THE SULTAN OF SWAT” BEGINS TO PAY OFF FOR NEW YORK

The Galveston Daily News
Galveston, Texas
May 2, 1920

Sports page headline: “BABE RUTH HITS OUT FIRST 1920 HOME RUN.”As the Yankees defeated the Boston Red Sox 6-0, the account reports, “Ruth hit his first home run in a New York uniform in a championship game.”  He went 2 for 4 against the Sox this day.  The story contains the complete box score of the game. It’s interesting that a Texas newspaper would pay so much attention, but Babe Ruth was starting to become a national superstar!  In 1920, Ruth went on to shatter the existing record by clubbing 54 round trippers in a single season! This was his first historic HR as a Yankee.

Complete newspaper. Usual browning, but very nice as it had been stored flat in a bound volume by a major institution. For the Yankee fan!

$375

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YANKEES BUY BABE RUTH FROM THE BOSTON RED SOX!

yankees-buy-babe-ruth-article-3.jpgHIGHEST PRICE EVER PAID FOR A BASEBALL PLAYER
“THE CURSE OF THE BAMBINO”
POSSIBLY THE WORST TRADE IN BASEBALL HISTORY (for the Sox, that is)!

The World
New York
January 6, 1920

In a startling deal that was to have a long-lasting impact on the entire American League, the Boston Red Sox agree to sell George Herman “Babe” Ruth to the New York Yankees for a record price of over $100,000 (and this was in 1920)!  The single-column front page headlines announce the story to delighted New York Yankee fans:“YANKEES BUY RUTH AND HOME RUN BAT FOR OVER $100,000.” “Pay Highest Price in History.” “Col. Ruppert Says New York is Carrying Out Policy to Get a Winning Team.”  The Times Sports Section continues the amazing announcement with headlines and a superb photo of the new Yankee slugger. And, Ruth himself said he was “not surprised!” The star player stated, “When I made my demand on the Red Sox for $20,000 a year I had an idea they would choose to sell me rather than pay the increase, and I knew the Yankees were the most probable purchasers.”

Undoubtedly, this is one of the most historic sports issues we have ever owned–Babe Ruth’s acquisition by the Yankees reported in a large New York newspaper!  28 pp., complete and in very good condition. An absolute prize for the finest baseball collection!

SOLD

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JACKIE ROBINSON BREAKS THE BASEBALL RACIAL BARRIER

jackie-robinson-photo.jpgBROOKLYN DODGERS PURCHASE THE MINOR LEAGUE STAR

The New York Times
April 11, 1947

Sports page banner headline: “DODGER’S PURCHASE ROBINSON, FIRST NEGRO IN MODERN MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL.” Smaller headline reports: “International League Batting Champion Will Bid for Job in Big League Infield.” The Times issue includes the famous photograph of Jackie Robinson in a Brooklyn Dodger uniform smiling and shaking hands with Manager Clay Hopper, his minor league boss. Until Robinson was signed, blacks were relegated to the legendary Negro Leagues. This was certainly one of the most important events in African American sports history.

Here is the original and complete 46-page newspaper in outstanding condition. I would frame the historic sports page for an amazing conversational piece.  No good baseball memorabilia collection should lack this scarce paper.

$1,495

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VERY EARLY WESTERN BASEBALL GAME!! ALSO, THE RESOURCES OF ALASKA – GOLD MINING, FISHERIES, COAL

alask-wt-paper-mh.jpg“THE BASE-BALL GAME.”
Olympics of Victoria v. the Raniers of Olympia

The Olympia Transcript, Olympia, Washington Territory
Saturday, May 29, 1869

Page three sports report titled: THE BASE-BALL GAME,” describes a 3 1/2 hr. game of eight innings (rain stopped the game) won by the Olympics team of Victoria by a whopping score of 45 to 23 over the Raniers of Olympia. The box score is also published. A return match was scheduled for the Fourth of July. The paper goes on to say, “Although the boys were rather badly beaten, yet we think it not a fair test. They will play better on their own grounds.” This is the first time I’ve seen a baseball game this early played on the West Coast! Imagine–1869!

This very rare Washington Territorial newspaper also contains a front page report lauding the “almost inexhaustible and invaluable fisheries of Alaska, the gold fields of Cook’s Inlet and the Stickeen River region, the rich coal mines of Unalaska and the vast forests of timber so near our own ports.” The article appears to be very supportive of the 1867 Alaska Purchase (known as “Seward’s Folly”).

Four pages, very fine condition. A scarce Western newspaper filled with advertisements for saloons, drug stores, insurance companies and even the “OFFICE SUPT. INDIAN AFFAIRS.”

$625

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BABE RUTH DIES AT AGE 53

babe-ruth-dies-ff.jpg“The Sultan of Swat” Succumbs to Throat Cancer—Dies Peacefully in His Sleep

The New York Times
August 17, 1948

The New York Times announces the passing of Yankee baseball legend George Herman “Babe” Ruth with a large front page classic photo of the Babe swinging a bat (see scans). But, the star here is the Sports Section much of with is exclusively devoted to the “Home Run King” and his incredible career, including superb photos of Ruth and Lou Gehrig, Ruth as a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, at the microphone at Yankee Stadium on Babe Ruth Day, coaching a youngster, and a more recent photo.

The complete 44-page issue has been maintained all these years in excellent condition with just the usual browning to indicate its true age. An important addition to any great sports collection! I might read the reports and then have this professionally framed.

$1,250

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