DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. ASSASSINATED

king-shot-ff.jpgTHE GREAT CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER IS GUNNED DOWN IN MEMPHIS

Daily News
New York
April 5, 1968

In real “Breaking News,” this newspaper prints the huge front page headline: “MARTIN KING SHOT TO DEATH. Gunned Down in Memphis.”

Page two contains the story under the headline: “Rev. King Slain by Memphis Sniper.” The story reads, in part, “Civil Rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, was shot to death shortly before 6 p.m. tonight as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel in downtown Memphis….Police said they were looking for “a young, white male, well dressed” who was seen running from a building across the street from the hotel, at 406 Mulberry St., in a predominantly Negro section.” The story also contains a large photograph (see scan) of the slain Civil Rights leader.

Here is the complete 28-page edition of the Daily News in excellent condition. I’ve never before seen the Civil Rights leader’s name printed “MARTIN KING.” Rare and very desirable. This one won’t last long.

$750

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SLAVERY IS ABOLISHED IN THE U.S.

13th-amendment-article.jpgTHE THIRTEENTH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION IS RATIFIED BY TWENTY-SIX STATES
ANNOUNCEMENT BY SECRETARY OF STATE WILLIAM SEWARD

The New York Herald
December 19, 1865

Following the end of the great Civil War, The Herald, the largest-selling newspaper at the time, publishes smack on page one, the amendment that abolished the heinous institution of slavery for all time.  Secretary of State William Seward issues the proclamation which states, in part:

“Article XIII, Section 1. NEITHER SLAVERY NOR INVOLUNTARY SERVITUDE, EXCEPT AS A PUNISHMENT FOR CRIME, WHEREOF THE PARTY SHALL HAVE BEEN DULY CONVICTED, SHALL EXIST WITHIN THE UNITED STATES, OR ANY PLACE SUBJECT TO THEIR JURISDICTION.”

On the editorial page, the announcement reads, in full:”THE NEWS. THE ANTI-SLAVERY AMENDMENT.  Secretary Seward has officially announced that notifications of the adoption by the Legislatures of twenty-seven States of the amendment to the national constitution abolishing and prohibiting slavery throughout the country have been filed in the State Department; that the number of States being thirty-six, the amendment has been ratified by three-fourths of them, and that it is therefore now a part of the constitution, and valid to all intents and purposes.”Here is the complete and original printing of eight pages, and in very fine condition. (Scan looks “brownish”–actually the newspaper is nice and white as printed) A key event in African American history, and a coup for any museum, institution, or collector. December 18, 2015, will mark the 150th anniversary of the ratification announcement!

$8,500

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JACKIE ROBINSON BREAKS THE BASEBALL RACIAL BARRIER

jackie-robinson-photo.jpgBROOKLYN DODGERS PURCHASE THE MINOR LEAGUE STAR

The New York Times
April 11, 1947

Sports page banner headline: “DODGER’S PURCHASE ROBINSON, FIRST NEGRO IN MODERN MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL.” Smaller headline reports: “International League Batting Champion Will Bid for Job in Big League Infield.” The Times issue includes the famous photograph of Jackie Robinson in a Brooklyn Dodger uniform smiling and shaking hands with Manager Clay Hopper, his minor league boss. Until Robinson was signed, blacks were relegated to the legendary Negro Leagues. This was certainly one of the most important events in African American sports history.

Here is the original and complete 46-page newspaper in outstanding condition. I would frame the historic sports page for an amazing conversational piece.  No good baseball memorabilia collection should lack this scarce paper.

$1,495

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NAT TURNER FINALLY CAPTURED AND IDENTIFIED!

nat-turner-mh.jpgTHE NEGRO REVOLT IN SOUTHAMPTON, VIRGINIA–THE LEADER SPEAKS!

Daily National Intelligencer, Washington, DC
Monday, November 7, 1831

The news is confirmed that, “….the murderer, Nat Turner, has at last been taken and safely lodged in prison.” The historic report goes on to state, “The poor wretch, we learn, admits all that has been alleged against him–says that he has at no time been five miles from the scene of his atrocities; and that he has frequently wished to give himself up, but could never summon sufficient resolution!” (see scan for the entire report)

(Background: “Gen.” Nathaniel Turner (1800-1831), convinced that “visions” had called him to free his enslaved brothers and sisters, along with sixty or more slaves, indiscriminately massacred some sixty white men, women, and children, beginning with his own master. The state militia and other volunteers finally quelled the revolt and tracked down the slaves. Turner went into hiding and was not captured until October 30. From November 1-3, Turner was interviewed by his court-appointed attorney, Thomas R. Gray, who transcribed his notes into “Confessions” which served as a main source for the data on the rebellion. Nat and sixteen fellow slaves were tried and subsequently hanged on November 11.)

This superb DC newspaper is simply loaded with notices for Runaway Slaves, Slaves for Sale, and “Negroes Wanted.” It’s incredible to realize the slave trading that was an everyday occurrence in our Nation’s Capital!

Four large pages, and in very fine condition. It will give you many hours of historic entertainment and perspective, and serve as quite the conversation piece.

$450

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN’S “HOUSE DIVIDED” SPEECH

house-divided-fp.jpg“A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand.”

New York Semi-Weekly Tribune
June 25, 1858

Abraham Lincoln opens his campaign as the Republican Candidate for the U.S. Senate seat from Illinois of Stephen A. Douglas with an impassioned speech against slavery (but not slaveholders). Boldly headlined on page six: “REPUBLICAN PRINCIPLES. SPEECH OF THE HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OF ILLINOIS, At the Republican State Convention, June 16, 1858.” Lincoln states, in part, “We are now far into the fifth year, since a policy was inititated with the avowed object and confident promise of putting an end to Slavery agitation…In my opinion, it will not cease until a crisis shall have been reached, and passed. ‘A house divided against itself cannot stand.’” (a quote from Matthew 12, verse 25). Lincoln goes on to state, “I believe this Government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free.” Lincoln’s speech is seconded in a superb Horace Greeley editorial which says, in part, “We need not ask attention to this concise and admirable statement. Mr. Lincoln never fails to make a good speech…and this is one of his best efforts. And its leading positions will be heartily indorsed by the great body of the Republicans of other States, as they already have been by those of Illinois.”

Eight pages, complete, and in fine, clean condition with old folds. Very few newspapers published Lincoln’s now legendary speech, and it is near impossible to locate another one anywhere. A very key opportunity for the Lincoln enthusiast/collector/scholar!    SOLD

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FREDERICK DOUGLASS–WASHINGTON, DC MARSHAL

fred-douglass-death-full-front.jpgALSO, A SKETCH OF JOSIAH HENSON, SAID TO BE THE INSPIRATION FOR “UNCLE TOM’S CABIN”–HE WAS A RESCUER OF SLAVES ON THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

Harper’s Weekly
New York

April 21, 1877

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), the most important African American figure of the 19th Century, is appointed Marshal of the District of Columbia by President Rutherford B. Hayes. This was the first appointment of an African American to require United States Senate confirmation. By occupying this post and distributing jobs, Douglass continued and strengthened the hold of black civil servants on minor government positions–the cornerstone of the staunchly middle-class black community in the Nation’s Capital.Douglass’ numerous accomplishments are documented in a superb biography on the fifth page with a sketch (see scans). Born a slave in 1818, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Douglass learned to read and write early in life, escaped the bonds of slavery, and went on to become an orator, author, abolitionist, statesman, minister, journalist, newspaper publisher, and even a consultant to President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War.

Twenty pages, complete issue in excellent condition. A key item for the collector/historian of African Americana.

$425

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