FREDERICK DOUGLASS–WASHINGTON, DC MARSHAL

fred-douglass-death-full-front.jpgALSO, A SKETCH OF JOSIAH HENSON, SAID TO BE THE INSPIRATION FOR “UNCLE TOM’S CABIN”–HE WAS A RESCUER OF SLAVES ON THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

Harper’s Weekly
New York

April 21, 1877

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), the most important African American figure of the 19th Century, is appointed Marshal of the District of Columbia by President Rutherford B. Hayes. This was the first appointment of an African American to require United States Senate confirmation. By occupying this post and distributing jobs, Douglass continued and strengthened the hold of black civil servants on minor government positions–the cornerstone of the staunchly middle-class black community in the Nation’s Capital.Douglass’¬†numerous accomplishments are documented in a superb biography on the fifth page with a sketch (see scans). Born a slave in 1818, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Douglass learned to read and write early in life, escaped the bonds of slavery, and went on to become an orator, author, abolitionist, statesman, minister, journalist, newspaper publisher, and even a consultant to President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War.

Twenty pages, complete issue in excellent condition. A key item for the collector/historian of African Americana.

$425

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