THE MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY

mutiny-bounty-begin655.jpgCAPTAIN BLIGH’S ACCOUNT AFTER HIS INCREDIBLE VOYAGE!
FLETCHER CHRISTIAN THE LEADER OF THE MUTINEERS!

The Gentleman’s Magazine
London

May, 1790

Here in print is the legendary mutiny taken from Captain Bligh’s personal account of the events. Bligh miraculously returned to England from Tahiti after a remarkable journey in an open boat following the mutiny lead by Fletcher Christian. The mutineers put Bligh and those men remaining loyal to him into a small boat with some provisions and sent them on their away across the Pacific!  After 46 days in an open boat, Bligh remarkably reached New Holland and were finally rescued. The report takes slightly more than a full page, and is simply incredible to read. This particular issue has been used as original source material in many books written on this event. Several great motion pictures have been made on this thrilling event, one starring Charles Laughton, and the newer film with Mel Gibson.

This is the original and complete issue, one hundred three pages, both antique plates intact. It’s also in near mint condition, however for accuracy, one unimportant page has a piece torn from the outer margin (you may not even notice this) and may have been printed this way. Professionally bound in green cloth with marbled end papers and gold lettering.  A superb presentation, and a major find!  First call reserves this amazing historical issue.

$1,025

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THE FALL OF THE BASTILLE

 THE FRENCH REVOLUTION BEGINS WITH TERRIBLE VIOLENCE!

The Gentleman’s Magazine
London

July, 1789

An incredible nine pages are devoted to the beginning of the French Revolution and the legendary storming of the infamous prison, the Bastille. The report states that, after the attack, “The Governor, the Prince, the Fort Major and officers, were conveyed to the Hotel de Ville, and, after a short trial, M. de Delaume and the Mayor were executed by first shooting them, and then cutting off their heads.”  In addition, this rare journal also contains a lengthy article on the trade winds including Dr. Ben Franklin’s own theories!  And, three valuable antique prints are present as well.

95 pp., excellent, bound in fine burgundy leather and stamped in gold.  This near mint issue will provide hours of historical entertainment. I find it fascinating to be able to read an account of the Bastille from the very time it happened. This is truly “living history.” Oh, almost forgot, The Gentleman’s Magazine was the first publication in history to use the title “Magazine!”

$1,350

AUSTRALIA IS COLONIZED – THE FIRST CONVICTS ARRIVE IN BOTANY BAY

australia-founded-front-page665.jpg HE ABORIGINES SHY AT FIRST, THEN TAKE GIFTS
CODE OF LAWS SET UP FOR THE INTREPID SETTLERS
SOME CONVICTS ATTEMPT ESCAPE ON FRENCH SHIPS!

The Gentleman’s Magazine
London

March 1789

This important issue of the first true magazine contains a full account of the landing at Botany Bay, the establishments of courts and the attempted escape of several convicts!  It was stated that more convicts will be arriving “to clear His Majesty’s gaols.”  After the landing of the two ships, “Sirius” and “Supply,” their officers came on shore and the detailed report indicated that the natives (aborigines) “….who had in small bodies witnessed their approach, appeared in great consternation on seeing these officers on their territory, and after setting up a yell, fled to the woods.” They came back when the British laid beads and other articles on the ground for the natives who finally came out to take these gifts. The “settlers” (convicts) were then read a code of laws and the report goes on to say, “The settlers were then told, that nothing could draw these laws into exercise, but their own demerits; and as it was then in their power to atone to their country for all the wrongs done at home, no other admonitions than those which their own consciences would dictate, it was hoped, would be necessary to effect their happiness and prosperity in their new country.” The article also says that some convicts attempted to escape Australia on French ships, however the French officers turned the men down, however two women were reported missing!

Also, an antique print of Voltaire’s home at Ferrney with accompanying letter.  And, there is an obituary of the famous Italian Rococo artist, Francesco Zuccarelli.

95 full pages., excellent condition and bound in rich green cloth with marbled endpapers and gold lettering. The Gentleman’s Magazine was the first publication in history to utilize the word “magazine” in a title.

$750

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DEATH OF THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH

gainsborough-dth-fp649.jpgThe Gentleman’s Magazine
London

August 1788

Here is a detailed obituary of the celebrated English portrait and landscape artist, Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788). The four page report mentions that Sir Joshua Reynolds was one of the pallbearers. In 1768, Gainsborough was one of the founders of the Royal Academy, and later painted King George II and Queen Charlotte.  Some of Gainsborough’s most popular paintings include The Blue Boy“,The Market Cart” (Tate Gallery, London), “The Wood Gatherers“, and “Robert Andrews and Mary, His Wife” (National Gallery, London).

In “AMERICAN NEWS” – The Fourth of July celebration in Philadelphia takes place amid the recent ratification of the US Constitution.

The complete issue with two antiques plates. It’s in near mint condition, and was professionally bound in modern green cloth with marbled end papers and gold lettering. The Gentleman’s Magazine was the first publication in history to utilize the title “Magazine.”  This is an issue that will take you back to the late 18th century and provide hours of historical entertainment.  I found it hard to put down!

$265

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THE FIRST SUCCESSFUL HOT AIR BALLOON FLIGHT

balloon-flight-1783-front-page669.jpgMONTGOLFIER MAKES HISTORY OVER PARIS

The Gentleman’s Magazine
London

December 1783

Jacques Etienne Montgolfier demonstrates history’s first free flight by man, an ascent over Paris in his newly invented hot air balloon. Piloted by Physicist Jean Francois Pilatre de Rozier and Francois Laurent, Marquis d’Arlandes, they flew for 25 minutes at low altitude over Paris landing a few miles to the south of the city.  The report is quite interesting to read, stating in part, “The machine was then seen to rise in quite a majestic manner, and when it reached the elevation of about 250 feet, the intrepid travellers, shaking their hats, saluted the spectators.” After ascending several thousand feet and soaring over Paris…”The travellers, satisfied with their experiment, agreed to descend; but perceiving that the wind was carrying them on the houses of the street de Seve, in the suburb of St. Germain, with great presence of mind, immediately unfolded more gaz (gas), and rose again, pursuing their way, till they found themselves past the metropolis, in the open fields, where, with the utmost composure, they came down, without having felt the slightest inconvenience….”

81 pages, in near mint condition and bound in green cloth with marbled end papers and gold lettering.  A museum piece not found in the Smithsonian Collection.

$1,450

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THE HISTORY OF TOBACCO….WRITTEN IN 1731

history-of-tobacco-begin673.jpg“It’s Name is acquir’d from the Island Tobago….”
IS IT GOOD OR BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH?

The Gentleman’s Magazine
London

September, 1731

Here is a very early and unique account of the history and uses of tobacco–I’ve already read it three times!  In part, “THIS Plant of American growth and call’d by the Indians Petun, or Petum.They apply it to two Uses. First, upon any great Weariness, they make themselves dizzy and drowsy with the Fume of it taken in at their Mouths, upon which they go to sleep, and rise wonderfully refresh’d. The other Use they make of it, is to intoxicate themselves with the Smoak of it when they prophecy; this they do by throwing the Leaves into a Fire, and then sucking up the Smoak thro’ a Cane.” The article goes on to opine, “The best way to distinguish whether Smoaking be for the Health, is to consider the Constitution, whether Phlegmatick, and subject to raw waterish Houmours, then it may be beneficial; but in lean and hectick Constitutions it is pernicious.”

This issue also contains “breaking news” that two Spanish Galleons sank in a terrible hurricane.  Research has shown there was a big storm in Barbados that year. The galleons were likely filled with gold, jewels and other valuable commodities.

Forty-two pages in very fine, clean condition.  This was only the ninth issue of the world’s first magazine.

$495

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ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND ARE UNITED

great-britain-formed-1707-lon-gaz-proc.jpgTHE FOUNDING OF GREAT BRITAIN

The Post Boy
London, UK
May 1, 1707

An Act of Union unites the English and Scottish Parliaments – one of the most important events in British history – to become GREAT BRITAIN. Front page proclamation of Queen Anne, followed by the complete Declaration of the Union. A major factor in winning over Scottish opinion was the decision of the English Parliament to include a clause in the Treaty that safeguarded the Presbyterian Church. The Scots were also allowed to keep their own legal system. This first report of the Union is actually printed on the very day it became effective. The paper also contains congratulations to the Queen on the event from many counties, boroughs, and towns throughout the Kingdom.  And a wonderful feature in this pristine issue is a woodcut sketch of the new Coat of Arms of Great Britain!

Single sheet issue, and kept over 300 years in superb, almost original condition. Incredibly, this ultra-rare early newspaper is priced the same as a poor condition 1952 Mickey Mantle baseball card of which there are many hundreds!

$5,500

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THE CORONATION OF WILLIAM AND MARY

wm-mary-coron-top637.jpgTHE OFFICIAL FIRST REPORT ON THE GRAND FESTIVITIES IN LONDON

The London Gazette
April 15, 1689

Complete front page details of the festivities, pageantry and the actual Coronation of William of Orange and his Queen Mary who in 1688 in the Glorious Revolution, invaded England driving King James II from the throne. At Westminster Abbey, the report reads in part, “Next followed the Communion; And Their Majesties having made their second Oblation, Received the Holy Sacrament. Then the Bishop Read the final Prayers, and Their Majesties retiring into St. Edward’s Chapel, and being new Arrayed in Purple Velvet, returned to Westminster-Hall, wearing Their Rich Crowns of State, and the Nobility their Coronets.” In other news, France once again declares war on Spain.

Single sheet as issued and printed on both sides. Cut a bit off center, but in in lovely condition.  This was the first printing of the Coronation as The Gazette was the semiofficial newspaper of England.

$4,950

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THE POPE ACCUSED OF BEING THE ANTICHRIST!

popery-1681-fp643.jpgRARE 1681 NEWSBOOK DISCUSSES THIS IMPORTANT MATTER

The Weekly Pacquet of ADVICE FROM ROME, or The History of POPERY
London

July 29, 1681

This scarce anti-Catholic newsbook contains a lengthy and absolutely fascinating article on “A Catalog of Famous Men that have Asserted the Pope to be the Antichrist.” This was the period in England wherein the so-called “Popish Plot” against the Church of England was “discovered.”

Eight pages, complete and in clean, near mint condition.  This is a quite remarkable find!  First call or email gets it!

$270

THE FIRST NEWSPAPER IN HISTORY

oxford-gaz-1-fp.jpgTHE FIRST NEWS PUBLICATION ISSUED IN NEWSPAPER FORMAT
A MUST HAVE FOR THE FINEST COLLECTION OR MAJOR MUSEUM

The Oxford Gazette
Oxford, England (reprinted in London)
November 13-16, 1665 (No. 1)

The Mitchell Archives is extremely proud to present issue number one of what most experts consider to be the very first newspaper ever printed. The publication meets the seven standards for a newspaper including longevity, availability to all classes, and more importantly, text divided into columns. Before the Gazette was published, the privileged classes obtained the news from weekly “newsbooks,” pamphlets with no text-dividing columns. The Gazette was first printed in Oxford, England, as King Charles II held Court in that city sixty miles west of London in order to “avoid the Plague.” In February, 1666, the King decided that the Plague had subsided enough to take his Court back to London, and he brought the Oxford Gazette along–with issue no. 24, it became the legendary London Gazette, an official paper still published today.  Interestingly, as the first American newspaper wasn’t published until 1704, the Oxford/London Gazette was shipped across the Atlantic Ocean to the Colonies to provide the news to the English residents in “the New World.”

In the news, this premiere issue contains the so-called “Bill of Mortality,” reporting the latest deaths from the Great Plague that continued to sweep through London and other parts of the British Isles and Europe. The paper states that 1,050 Londoners died of the plague, a decrease of 428 from the previous week.

Single sheet, double-sided, fine condition with just mild foxing. This is truly a very unusual opportunity that seldom becomes available. For the finest collection, newspaper publisher, top reporter, or museum/institution. It has been in my personal collection for many years. I would have this professionally framed in double-glass.

$37,500

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