THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR AND DEATH OF ADMIRAL HORATIO NELSON

1805-trafalgar-mast-1.jpgA DECISIVE VICTORY FOR ENGLAND, BUT ALSO A GREAT LOSS (NELSON)
COMPLETE EYEWITNESS DETAILS OF THE BLOODY BATTLE

The London Gazette, EXTRAORDINARY
November 6, 1805

We are truly proud to present first report of Admiral Collingwood’s (Nelson’s second in command) official account of the most famous English Naval battle since the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1688. The admiral describes the triumph over the combined French and Spanish Fleet, lists the dead and wounded, and laments the death of Britain’s naval hero, Lord Horatio Nelson, who was mortally wounded while pacing the deck of his powerful flagship Victory.  The long report reads, in small part: “Euryalus, off Cape Trafalgar, October 22, 1805, SIR, The ever to be lamented Death of Vice-Admiral Lord Viscount Nelson, who, in the late Conflict with the Enemy, fell in the Hour of Victory, leave to me the Duty of Informing my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty…”, followed by an in-depth account of the events leading to the battle, and the historic sea-fight itself. Collingwood continues: “…The Action began at Twelve o’clock, by the leading Ships of the Columns breaking through the Enemy’s line…the Conflict was severe; the Enemy’s Ships were fought with a Gallantry highly honorable to their Officers, but the Attack on them was irresistible, and it pleased the Almighty Disposer of all Events, to grant His Majesty’s Arms a complete and Glorious Victory…Such a Battle could not be fought without sustaining a great Loss of Men, I have not only to lament, in common with the British Navy, and the British Nation, on the Fall of the Commander in Chief, the Loss of a Hero, whose Name will be immortal, and his name ever dear to his Country.” Nelson invoked several new tactics that broke the enemy’s line of warships and created chaos–many of the French and Spanish ships never got into the battle!  In London, Trafalgar Square commemorated the legendary victory, and features a large statue of Horatio Nelson. In addition, his flagship “Victory” is berthed in Portsmouth where I had the honor to be piped aboard in my Naval uniform in 1987, and was allowed to examine Nelson’s cabin–quite a thrill for me.

Four pages, last page blank, partial auburn tax stamp on page two, excellent condition throughout.  All other newspapers obtained their reports on the event from this printing. One of the rarest and most sought after of English newspapers.

$7,500

1805-trafalgar-death-of-nelson.jpg1805-trafalgar-beginning-of-article.jpg1805-trafalgar-page-two.jpg1805-trafalgar-page-three.jpg1805-trafalgar-victory-complete.jpg1805-trafalgar-collingwood.jpg