THOMAS JEFFERSON ANNOUNCES A BUILDING CODE FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

dc-jeff-proc-mh.jpgThe President declares that, “that the outer and party walls of all Houses in the said City, shall be built of Brick or Stone….”

Also, the citizens of the Indiana Territory petition Congress (via Governor William Henry Harrison) to “extinguish” the Indian lands in order to provide more territory for white settlement!! Full front page printing of the “LETTER FROM WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON.”

National Intelligencer, Washington, DC
Monday, February 21, 1803

President Jefferson lays out the new building code for the District of Columbia proclaiming that all new houses should be built of brick or stone, and “….that the wall of no house shall be higher than 40 feet to the roof in any part of the City, nor shall any be lower than 35 feet on any of the Avenues.” Present day D.C. has changed little from this original code–there are no tall buildings in the city other than the Washington Monument. The President’s Proclamation appears on page one of the National Intelligencer, Washington’s premier newspaper.

4 pp., very fine condition. The early Washington advertisements and sales of houses alone give a real “feel” to life in the Nation’s Capital when it was but three years old!

$225

dc-jeff-proc.jpgdc-jeff-proc-ads.jpg

THE MARINE CORPS IS ESTABLISHED BY CONGRESSIONAL ACT!

marine-corps-act-mh.jpg“Semper Fidelis!”

Columbian Centinel, Boston
Wedesday, August 22, 1798

The Act establishing and organizing the Marine Corps takes up the entire first column on page one and is signed, in script type, John Adams, President of the United States.” The officers and men chosen will be subject to the rules and regulations of the United States Navy. There are other front page Federal acts including: “An Act to augment the Army of the United States; and for other purposes.” The act sets the composition of an army regiment, and is really fascinating to read.

Also, inside page news that Admiral Horatio Nelson had chased Napoleon and his French fleet through the Mediterranean and had them bottled up in Corsica!

Four pages, fine condition overall. The first such issue we’ve handled. I would read the paper through and through and then have it professionally framed.

$7,500

marine-corps-act-beg.jpgmarine-corps-act-end.jpgmarine-corps-act-lord-nelson.jpgmarine-corps-act-army-act.jpg

THE FRIGATE “CONSTITUTION” IS LAUNCHED IN BOSTON

constitution-launch-fp.jpgTHE VESSEL TO BE KNOWN AS “OLD IRONSIDES” SLIDES INTO THE SEA

Columbian Centinel, Boston
October 25, 1797

The powerful new 44-gun frigate, “Constitution,” which would become famous during the War of 1812, is launched in Boston harbor. An eyewitness report reads, in part: “The best judges have pronounced the CONSTITUTION, like her archetype to be a perfect model of elegance, strength, and durability.” The famous ship served gloriously in the Tripolitan conflict in the Mediterranean, the quasi-naval war with France, and the War of 1812, in which she won three major victories over British frigates, stunning the naval world. In 1925, the ship was refurbished and is now permanently moored in Boston Harbor as a national monument.

“Off with their heads!” The front page contains a fascinating report on the origin of the infamous French execution weapon, the Guillotine! It was said “….that sixty persons perished by it in less than an hour….”

Four pages, fine condition with just normal light foxing. A rare home-town newspaper report.

$1,295

constitution-launch-guillotine.jpgconstitution-launch-beg2.jpg

THE NEW AMERICAN NAVY – U.S.S “CONSTITUTION,” “CONSTELLATION,” AND “UNITED STATES” FRIGATES

constitution-launch-fp.jpgThe Federal Act Providing for a Naval Armament
Congress Gives the “Green Light” to Fitting Out America’s First Powerful Naval Vessels

Columbia Centinel, Boston
Wednesday, July 19, 1797

The front page of this nationally-known Federalist newspaper publishes the Congressional Act providing for the manning and employment of the new and powerful frigates “Constitution,” “Constellation,” and “United States” – up to this date only the latter had been launched. The Act also sets the officers and crew required to man these new ships, and establishes a pay scale as well. A captain, for example, was to receive $75 per month, and six rations per day! The Act is signed, in script type, “John Adams, President of the United States.”

There is news from France that the Marquis de Lafayette, America’s great friend and leader from the Revolutionary War, has been released from prison with the aid of Napoleon Bonaparte.

4 large pages, fine condition, and never trimmed at the margins–a plus. A most important issue for the collector of U.S. Naval History.

$475

constitution-launch-beg2.jpgconstitution-launch-guillotine.jpg

TENNESSEE BECOMES A STATE

tennessee-statehood-fp.jpgTHE “VOLUNTEER STATE” JOINS THE UNION

Columbian Centinel, Boston
July 23, 1796

Front page printing of the Federal Act admitting Tennessee to the United States, signed in script type, “G. Washington, President of the United States.” Thus, slave-holding Tennessee becomes the 16th State in the Union. Former Governor of the State of Franklin, John Sevier, is chosen first Governor of Tennessee. In a partisan Federalist move, Tennessee is permitted just one congressman for the first four years of statehood! Four other new federal acts also appear on page one.

Four pages, fine condition with just light foxing at and near the right margin. This rare newspaper would frame beautifully as it is boldly printed!

$950

tennessee-statehood-act.jpgtennessee-statehood-ship-ads.jpg

SUPREME COURT DECIDES CHISHOLM V. GEORGIA

chisholm-fp.jpgCan a State be Sued by One or More Individuals of Another State?

Columbian Centinel, Boston
Wednesday, March 13, 1793

In this early landmark case, the U.S. Supreme Court rules that a citizen of one state may indeed sue another state in a federal court, as provided for in Article II, Section 2 of the Federal Constitution. This decision will eventually lead to the 11th Amendment which repealed this section of the Constitution in 1798. The front page reports the case and explains the decisions of five of the Justices including Chief Justice John Jay.

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. Front page “OFFICIAL LETTER, to be delivered on the part of the French Republick to the United States of America.” In part, “Our brothers of the United States will, no doubt, have heard with gladness, the new revolution which overthrew that last obstacle to our liberty. This revolution was necesary. Royalty was still existing, and in every constitution where it exists there is no true liberty. Kings and Equality are incompatible with each other; it is their business to conspire against equality, and against the sovereignty of Nations.” A fascinating piece of history–you’ll read this more than once!

Four pages, fine condition. Any attorney or judge would like this original newspaper for his office!

$1,150

chisholm-beg-case.jpgchisholm-fr-nat-ass-beg.jpgchisholm-john-jay.jpg

THE UNITED STATES MINT IS ESTABLISHED

coinage-act-mh.jpgRegular U.S. Coinage to begin in 1793

Columbian Centinel, Boston
April 21, 1792

Under the heading, BY AUTHORITY, SECOND CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES,” is the complete text of the Federal Act authorizing the establishment of a Mint, and prescribing a decimal system of coinage – silver dollar, gold quarter and half eagle, half dollar, quarter, dime, cent and half cent. The Act is signed in script type carrying over to page two: “G. Washington, President of the United States.”

In other news, President Washington appoints “ANTHONY WAYNE” as a Major General in the United States Army, along with four other generals. Known as “Mad” Anthony Wayne, the general would defeat the Indians in the Northwest Territory (Ohio) in 1794 at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. There is also news from Haiti on the bloody slave rebellion soon to be led by Toussaint Louverture.

Four pages, very fine condition. For the numismatist (coin collector or dealer) who has everything!

$1,950

coinage-act-beg.jpgcoinage-act-coin-descs.jpgcoinage-act-end-gw.jpg

VERMONT BECOMES THE 14TH STATE

vermont-mh.jpgTHE “GREEN MOUNTAIN STATE” ADMITTED TO THE UNION

Dunlap’s American Daily Advertiser, Philadelphia
Monday, February 21, 1791

President George Washington signs the act admitting Vermont as the 14th State. Vermont had just officially ratified the new Federal Constitution. The complete printing of the Act appears on the third page, signed “George Washington, President of the United States,” and also John Adams as Vice president, and Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State, all in type.

Four pages, complete as issued, very fine condition.

$750

vermont-act.jpg

THE FIRST ACT PASSED BY CONGRESS

first-act-mh.jpg“An ACT to regulate the Time and Manner of administering certain Oaths”Also, the Presbyterian Church congratulates General Washington upon being elected our nation’s first president….with his reply in its entirety!

Gazette of the United States, New York City
June 6, 1789

Page four publishes the very first Congressional Act, and is signed in type: “George Washington, President of the United States.” The Act required that Senators, Representatives, and other officials would be sworn into office by the administering of their oath.

4 pp., very good. Normal foxing spots on the front page and page two not affecting text readability–they look more prominent in the scan. The Gazette of the United States was the “unofficial” organ of the Federalist Party of George Washington, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton.

The perfect gift for your favorite representative!

$1,950

first-act-gw-to-presby.jpgfirst-act-itself.jpgfirst-act-presb-to-gw.jpg

THE NEW UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION…IN ITS ENTIRETY!

gm-constitut-dec-fp.jpg“WE THE PEOPLE….”

The Gentleman’s Magazine, London
November, 1787 & December, 1787 (two issues)

The “New Constitution of the United States of America” is printed in its entirety over two consecutive issues of this famous magazine. This was the first chance for the people of Great Britain (the “Mother Country”) to read the immortal words: “We the People, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity . . .” The document is signed in type, “John Hancock.”

Each issue is ninety-five pages, excellent condition throughout, and still has the scarce antique plates included. A rare opportunity to own a contemporary printing of the Constitution of the United States. American newspaper printings have sold for many hundreds of thousands of dollars when they have been auctioned. The Gentleman’s Magazine was the very first periodical in history to use the word “Magazine” in the title!

$7,500/set

gm-constitut-beginning.jpggm-constitut-art-vii.jpg

« Previous Page