DESCRIPTION OF THE WASHINGTON NAVY YARD – THREE NEWSPAPERS

navy-yard-3-mhs.jpgEvening Star, Washington, DC
December 15, 16 & 18, 1854 (three complete newspapers)

In a lengthy serialized report, the Navy Yard is described as a “Miniature World of Science, Art, and Industry.” Under the command of Captain Hiram Pauling, the yard has prospered and is called “the very life of the southeastern section of Washington, DC.” I’ve worked at the Navy Yard in a Reserve Unit so it’s fascinating to me to read how very different the Yard was in the 1850s. My favorite part of this report was “THE ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT.” In part, “Near this (the cap machine) is a bullet machine (also novel and interesting) for making musket and pistol balls by compression between two dies.”

Each paper contains four pages of news, editorials, and ads from early Washington. The incredible “cure-all” potions and “medicines” are particularly interesting. These papers are hard to put down. As I’m from Washington, DC, I can relate to some of the addresses and places mentioned. Excellent condition throughout.

$295/set of three consecutive original newspapers

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DEATH OF DANIEL WEBSTER (1782-1852)

d-webster-dies-mh.jpgOne country, one constitution, one destiny

Exeter News-Letter, New Hampshire
Monday, November 1, 1852

This historic issue contains not one, but two lengthy articles announcing the death of one of America’s greatest statesmen and orators. One pieces says, in part: “DANIEL WEBSTER. One of the most illustrious men that ever flourished in the tide of time, one of those exponents of wisdom and truth which God occasionally endows with His richest gifts as a leader of our race, a man in whom centered thse elements that compose the structure of human greatness, one whose words took on the dignity and sanctity of oracles, has just finished his mortal career….The death of Mr. Webster leaves a vacuum in our national councils that no person now upon the stage of active life gives promise of filling.”

The advertisements and notices are really fantastic in this original newspaper. There are large illustrations of stagecoaches (the largest I’ve seen in any newspaper), railroad cars with locomotives, and even an early iron stove!

Four large pages, in fine condition. The inside pages are bordered in black as a memorial to Daniel Webster.

$195

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JOHN J. AUDUBON DIES

audubon-dies-mh.jpgNewark Daily Advertiser
January 28, 1851

Artist and naturalist John J. Audubon (1785-1851) dies in New York City. The short, but historic report of his death reads as follows: “Mr. J.J. AUDUBON, the distinguished Naturalist, we learn, died at this residence in 155th st., N.Y., yesterday, aged 76 years. His ‘Birds of America’ is the greatest of his works, and probably the most valuable contribution to that branch of science in the world.” Audubon also drew mammals, and his other major work was “Vivivparous Quadripeds of America,” published just after his final trip out West in 1843. The Audubon Society today is a living tribute to his perseverance, appreciation for conservation, and love of the wilderness and its animal inhabitants.

The California Gold Rush–Easterners are still quitting their jobs and heading for the rich gold fields of the West. There are numerous ads for Express companies, banks, and more under “California Notices,” as well as individuals announcing their intentions to go West!

4 pages in superb condition. The illustrated notices for stagecoach, steamboat, and railroad lines are fascinating!

$135

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NEWLY DISCOVERED PLANET TO BE NAMED “NEPTUNE”

neptune-mh.jpgLe Verrier’s Planet Finally Gets a Name!

National Intelligencer, Washington, DC
Thursday, March 4, 1847

The “newest” member of the Solar System, a body discovered by Frenchman Urbain Le Verrier, is finally named. A short front page report announces the historic news: “THE NEW PLANET.–The Bureau of Longitudes of Paris has come to an agreement with the principal astronomers of Europe, as Gausz, Encke, Strure, and Herschel, to give the name of NEPTUNE to the new planet discovered under the indications of M. Le Verrier. The planet will be denoted on the astronomical chart by the sign of a trident.” Le Verrier predicted the location of such a planet in 1846, using only mathematics and close observations of the orbit of Uranus.

Also, a report that $3,000,000 was to be earmarked to enable President Polk to make a treaty with Mexico ending the Mexican War includes lengthy debate in the United States Senate as well as the printing of the Act to appropriate the funding. This meaty issue also contains the latest war news from the U.S. troops still fighting in Mexico.

4 pp., complete and in very good condition. Bit of staining and wear on one fold, and a few minor tape mends.

$175

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EARLY NEWSPAPER PRINTED IN DETROIT!

detroit-mh.jpgINCREDIBLE “CURE-ALL ADVERTISEMENTS INCLUDING BALDNESS!
JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER NEW POEM

Detroit Daily Advertiser
March 12, 1842

“DEMOCRACY,” a poem by John Greenleaf Whittier is published in full on page two. But, what I find truly fascinating are the several hundred ads and notices including many for alleged cure-alls for every disease from coughs to cancer. I think my favorite ad is the one for baldness that reads, in part: “BALDNESS. A beautiful head of Hair is the grandest ornament belonging to the human frame….In short, not even the loss of property fills the generous thinking youth with that heavy sinking gloom as does the loss of his hair. To avert all these unpleasant circumstances OLDRIDGE’S BALM OF COLUMBIA stops the hair from falling off on the first application, and a few bottles restores it again.” (see scan for complete advertisement)

Four pages, fine condition with just minor foxing. Sure was interesting to read this one! You get a real sense of Detroit in the mid-19th Century, long before it became the “Motor City.” Reasonably priced, too.

$95

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THE MORMONS IN 1841 – LENGTHY ACCOUNT – JOSEPH SMITH

mormon-1841-mh.jpgTHE MORMON SETTLEMENT IN OHIO
ANTI-MORMONISM LECTURES OF WILLIAM HARRIS

The New York Herald
August 10, 1841

Page two headings read: “Highly Important from the Far West–Progress of the Mormons–Joe Smith in his Glory–The Devil and the Unbelievers at Work — No Go.” This issue contains almost two full columns on the “Origin and History of the Mormons,” “Baptism For The Dead,” “Temperance Among the Mormons,” “The Mormon Settlement,” and more. The religion itself is cast in a very negative light. I’ve scanned some of the piece, and I can tell you after reading it more than once, it is quite interesting to see this early view.

Four pages, and in very fine condition. A very early issue of James Gordon Bennett’s famous Herald. Forgot to mention that there is also a front page report on an Indian battle between the Sioux and the Pottamattamies in Missouri. I’ve scanned this also.

$375

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PRESIDENT WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON DIES AFTER JUST ONE MONTH IN OFFICE!

dth-harrison-mh.jpg“Old Tippecanoe” Succumbs to Pneumonia–Doctors Bled Him (with Leeches)!
Vice President John Tyler of Virginia Succeeds Harrison

The Globe, Washington, DC
Monday Evening, April 5, 1841

William Henry Harrison, who successfully led American troops against Tecumseh and his Indian warriors in the Battle of Tippecanoe (1811), and during the War of 1812, defeated the chief again in the Battle of the Thames, dies of pneumonia at the White House. At his inauguration, one month earlier, he delivered a 1 1/2 hour address (edited by his new Secretary of State, Daniel Webster) outside in bitter weather which was probably responsible for bringing on a bad cold shortly thereafter. His doctors tried everything from bleedings to blistering(!), but to no avail. His “advanced” age (68) certainly didn’t help matters either. Harrison’s death spelled the demise of the Whig Party.

This newspaper contains the news of his death, the report of his bedside physicians, and a communication from SecState Daniel Webster to Vice President Tyler informing the latter of the President’s unfortunate end. Tyler took the Oath of Office on April 6th.

Four large pages with all columns bordered in thick black mourning rules. Excellent condition throughout. More valuable than other newspapers as this was a Washington, DC newspaper. It took days and weeks for the news to reach other cities to be published around the country. For a fine Presidential collection!

$360

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DAVY CROCKETT’S SON A CONGRESSMAN – SPEECH OF JOHN WESLEY CROCKETT OF TENNESSEE!

kent-dth-mh.jpgONE YEAR AFTER HIS FATHER, WAR HERO DAVY CROCKETT, DIED AT THE ALAMO, DAVY’S SON DELIVERS AN IMPASSIONED SPEECH ON THE FLOOR OF THE HOUSE!

DEATH OF MARYLAND GOVERNOR JOSEPH KENT
DEBATE ON THE FINANCIAL PANIC OF 1837
MISSISSIPPI SLAVES FOR SALE!

National Intelligencer, Washington, DC
Tuesday, November 28, 1837

This prime Washington, DC newspaper publishes a lengthy speech by John Wesley Crockett, son of the famed Indian fighter/Alamo martyr David Crockett of Tennesse who had also been a congressman. The address concerns a House bill authorizing the issuance of Treasury notes, and is quite something to read. (To tell you the truth, I didn’t realize until I read this newspaper that Davy Crockett had a congressman son who followed right smack in his famous father’s footsteps!)

This “meaty” issue also contains both a news item and a very lengthy editorial on the life and passing of Doctor Joseph Kent, ex-Governor of Maryland who was also a Senator from that state. A lengthy biography is included. Kent County, Maryland was named for this statesman. There are also many interesting columns of Congressional debate on events concerning the historic financial panic of 1837.

A classified advertisement reads: “VALUABLE SLAVES, NOW IN MISSISSIPPI, are offered for sale upon credit. W.H. J. DORSEY, Chaptico, Maryland.”

4 large pages, complete, fully original, and in fine condition with just one minor stain. It’s really nice!

$250

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1833 DRUGS AND MEDICINES FOR SALE//EARLY NEWSPAPER FROM GETTYSBURG!

gburg-mh.jpgA Cure for What Ails You.
Also, Incredible Sketch of a Meteor Shower!

Republican Banner, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Tuesday, November 26, 1833

Huge front page illustrated advertisement placed by “JESSE GILBERT, Druggest, Gettysburg, PA” listing his wares. They include “five brands of Worm Syrup, Balsam of Life, Horse Powders”, sulfur and even opium!

On page three is an illustration of a “Shower of Fire”, surely a large meteor shower recently observed in the heavens. Lengthy poem titled, “The Plague in the Forest,” by none other than former President John Quincy Adams.

Four large pages, very nice condition. A very rare paper that shows life in the quiet Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg some thirty years before the famous Civil War battle.

$135

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COW KILLED ON THE NEW B&O RAILROAD TRACKS!

bo-rr-mh.jpgEARLY HISTORY OF THE RAILROAD
POSSIBLE SLAVE REBELLION UNCOVERED NEAR NEW ORLEANS!

Boston Daily Advertiser
June 23, 1831

A new B&O locomotive train traveling 15-20 miles per hour strikes a cow, stopping the train in its tracks (no pun intended)! Several passengers on board received bruises, but none were seriously hurt. This event probably led to the use of fences around tracks, not for children, but for cows! The cowcatcher also became standard after this. The newspaper contains several other reports on early railroads (see scans) including this: “Traveling (from Baltimore) on the Rail Road Extended. The first track on the 2d Division of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road was completed on Wednesday last, except a small portion of the horse path which will be finished this day and ready for travel.” The rails extended from Ellicott’s Mills to Patapsco (thirteen miles) which meant that passengers could now travel some 26 miles from Baltimore. Another article talks about the Troy and Vermont Railroad.

A potential slave revolt was apparently discovered near New Orleans when planters discovered an immense cache of arms and ammunition. “The negroes, it is said, intended to rise as soon as the sickly season began, and obtain possession of the city by massacreing the planters and white population.”

4 pages, and in extremely fine condition. You’ll also love the bold illustrated steamboat, stagecoach and sailing ship notices!

$137

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